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Haemophilia

Sex & Relationships

Thinking about your condition is the last thing you might want to think about when you start a relationship. Its important to consider though as it can impact on you both physically and emotionally. 

You might be unsure about how to talk to your partner about your condition. There is no right or wrong way to do so. It might help to have a think about where and when you might want to talk about it and also what questions they may have. You can read more here about talking to others about your condition, this is just as helpful when thinking about telling partners or friends. 

As your relationship develops you might start thinking about sex. With haemophilia it can be important to know how this may affect you regardless of which gender you choose to have sex with. 

Sex can cause a bleed in any part of the body including muscles or joints, like most other physical activities for someone with a bleeding disorder. The signs and symptoms of a bleed may not be visible immediately, some parts of the body are particularly vulnerable during and after sex and can include bruises or hematomas, muscle bleeds in the calf or forearm, or a joint bleed. Signs of bleeding can include pain, limitation of motion and swelling. 

It is important to also think about safe sex in a wider sense and the use of contraception and protection. Having haemophilia does not make you more succeptable to sexually transmitted infections but it is important to consider still and discuss with your partner. Communication during sex is important, from thinking about comfort and protecting from bleeds to wanting to stop at any point. 

Genetics

If you have haemophilia your team may have spoken to you about genetics. Haemophilia is a condition that is inherited and any children that you or your partner has. Your child may not have haemophilia, be a carrier of the condition but not be effected by it or may have the condition. 

It might be helpful for you and your partner to think about genetic testing if you are thinking about having children. You can find out more about this here but your team will also be able to talk to you more about genetics and what it all means and genetic testing. You can ask them any questions you have.